Author Topic: Ash Dieback  (Read 3370 times)

wendyenglish

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Ash Dieback
« on: November 18, 2012, 05:55:10 pm »
Ash dieback Chalara fraxinea hit the headlines recently, after it was discovered in East Anglia.  After an urgent country-wide survey was done, it was confirmed at 200 sites, many of which are in mature woodland.  The nearest site to Whitby so far is in Guisborough. Up to date information can be found on the forestry commission website http://www.forestry.gov.uk/chalara. It covers the spread of the disease, how to recognise symptoms and report findings, and precautions to take when walking through woodland. 

Dave Perry

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Re: Ash Dieback
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2012, 04:40:22 pm »
Wendy,

I'm not sure we can do anything to prevent the spread of this.  Its spread through airborne spores .  Its here now unfortunately, so banning imports of european saplings sounds a little like bolting the stable door....etc.,
Cleaning foot wear and so on is rather futile - after all you could be treading on spores wherever you are. 

Dutch elm disease had the same panic measures to prevent spread to no avail.  More damage was done to the environment by cutting down dead and diseased trees thus removing potential habitats for specialist insects, fungi, nesting sites for woodpeckers, owls etc., etc.,

Incidentally the last  hawthorne hedge I remember I planted in Ireland was from seedlings imported from Hungary!!!!  (We only found out afterwards)

Dave Perry

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Re: Ash Dieback
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2014, 09:07:04 pm »
WAlking back between Grosmont and Sleights I saw two or three ash trees which showed extensive die back.